WEBINAR FOR AUTHORS, EDITORS AND REVIEWERS

Bentham Open and Diffusion Editing are collaborating to organize a series of webinars for researchers, authors, editors, reviewers, academicians and professionals to help them gain comprehensive knowledge about scholarly publishing.

We invite you to register for the following webinar and enhance your understanding about the concept of open research. The registration is free of any charges for all the interested researchers.

Register for the Webinar.

WHAT DOES OPEN RESEARCH MEAN FOR YOU?

30th April, 2021 (10.00 GMT)

Open research means making content, data and publications free for all to view, download, and reuse with permission. Get up to speed with open research in our free webinar and learn about what this movement could mean for you and your career.

Register here: https://event.webinarjam.com/register/35/74rn3i71

ABOUT THE PRESENTER, DR. GARETH DYKE

Dr. Gareth Dyke writes content and runs highly engaging training courses aimed at early career researchers, predominantly working from home over the last 5 years.

Dr. Gareth is also a prolific scientific author who has published more than 280 articles in peer- reviewed journals over the last 20 years, including in Nature, Science, Proceedings of the National Academy (USA) and other high-profile outlets. His research has been widely covered in the media and he is often invited to present talks and lead workshops around the world, most recently in Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, China, Colombia, Spain, Hungary, Romania, and Slovakia. Workshops in China run by Gareth in 2019 were attended by more than 5,000 colleagues. He has written numerous news and other popular articles including in Scientific American, New Scientist, and Nature and is a regular contributor to The Conversation (scientific news website).

He manages the Taylor & Francis journal Historical Biology as Editor-in-Chief. Dr. Gareth has mentored students at all levels (Masters, PhD, Adult Education) and has developed a large range of in-class teaching and distance learning techniques. He has worked in the USA, Ireland, and the UK, including for more than 15 years as a full-time University academic (University College Dublin, National Oceanography Centre University of Southampton).

Dr. Gareth is uniquely positioned to teach and advise with authority on all aspects of the scientific publishing process, grant writing, and personal development as he is an experienced researcher, reviewer, editor, and journal manager with a strong background in technical and popular writing. He is accredited as a course leader and teacher by the Higher Education Authority (HEA) in the UK as well as by the Irish HEA.

RESEARCH ARTICLE – ACE2 Shedding and Furin Abundance in Target Organs may Influence the Efficiency of SARS-CoV-2 Entry

Author: Yuanchen Ma

Journal: The Open Bioinformatics Journal

Abstract

Background:

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is a lineage B coronavirus, causing the worldwide outbreak of Corona Virus Disease 2019 (COVID-19). Despite genetically closed to SARS-CoV, SARS-CoV-2 seems to possess enhanced infectivity and subtle different clinical features, which may hamper the early screening of suspected patients as well as the control of virus transmission. Unfortunately, there are few tools to predict the potential target organ damage and possible clinical manifestations caused by such novel coronavirus.

Methods:

To solve this problem, we use the online single-cell sequence datasets to analyze the expression of the major receptor in host cells that mediates the virus entry, including angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), and its co-expressed membrane endopeptidases.

Results:

The results indicated the differential expression of ADAM10 and ADAM17 might contribute to the ACE2 shedding and affect the membrane ACE2 abundance. We further confirm a putative furin-cleavage site reported recently in the spike protein of SARS-CoV-2, which may facilitate the virus-cell fusion. Based on these findings, we develop an approach that comprehensively analyzed the virus receptor expression, ACE2 shedding, membrane fusion activity, virus uptake and virus replication to evaluate the infectivity of SARS-CoV-2 to different human organs.

Conclusion:

Our results indicate that, in addition to airway epithelia, cardiac tissue and enteric canals are susceptible to SARS-CoV-2 as well.

RESEARCH ARTICLE – The Diagnostic Accuracy of Cardiac Enzymes-Lipid Profile Ratio for Diagnosing Coronary Heart Disease in Chest Pain Patients

Author: Mohamed M. Omran

Journal: The Open Biochemistry Journal

Abstract

Background:

Lipid abnormalities increase Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) risk. Our developed indexes 1,2 were reported in scientific Journals. Here, we verified and evaluated the cardiac enzymes-lipid profile ratio’s diagnostic value for diagnosing CHD patients.

Methods:

Lipid profiles and cardiac enzymes were estimated in all chest pain patients. The area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC) was used to evaluate the markers’ diagnostic accuracy.

Results:

There were varieties of significant differences (P < 0.01- P < 0.0001) of Creatine Kinase MB (CK-MB) – lipid profile ratio and Troponin I-lipid profile ratio within the groups of chest pain patients. For discriminating between Non-Coronary Chest Pain (NCCP) and Stable Angina (SA) groups, the AUCs were the greatest for CK-MB- High-density Lipoprotein (HDL) ratio (0.62) and for Troponin I-HDL (0.62). Moreover, for discriminating between NCCP and Unstable Angina (UA) groups, the AUC was the greatest for CK-MB-HDL ratio (0.97). Also, for discriminating between NCCP and Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI) groups, the AUC was the greatest for index 2 (0.99). Similarly, for discriminating between SA and UA groups, the AUC was the greatest for CK-MB-HDL ratio (0.90). For discriminating between SA and AMI groups, the AUC was the greatest for index 2 (0.97). Finally, for discriminating between UA and AMI groups, the AUC was the greatest for index 2 (0.78).

Conclusion:

Independent CK-MB-HDL ratio can be used as a good and simple index for diagnosing CHD in chest pain patients and discriminating between the different groups of these patients

To access this article, please visit:

https://benthamopen.com/FULLTEXT/TOBIOCJ-15-20

RESEARCH ARTICLE – Morphological and Proteomic Evaluation of Zea Mays in Response to Osmotic Stress

Author: T.B. Dikobe

Journal: The Open Biotechnology Journal

Abstract

Introduction:

Drought is the main abiotic stress responsible for crop loss worldwide. Maize (Zea mays L.) is a widely grown drought-sensitive crop used as a staple food by the growing population. Therefore, it is imperative to assess the molecular mechanisms behind drought response and tolerance in maize. Transcriptomic profiling of abiotic stress responsive pathways in various crops appeared to be an unreliable approach due to post-transcriptional modifications, while there is limited published data on molecular mechanisms of osmotic-stress response in maize. Hence our study aimed at profiling osmotic stress responsive proteins augmented by their associated morphological features in Zmays.

Materials and Methods:

In this regard, morphological and proteomic investigations were carried out on 16-day maize seedlings exposed to 5% (w/v) and 10% (w/v) polyethylene glycol(PEG) to induce osmotic-stress. Proteomics approach (one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis) compared differential protein abundance between controls and the osmotic stressed maize plants.

Results:

Morphological parameters such as plant growth, height, shoot diameter, leaf area, and colour were highly affected with PEG treatment as compared to the untreated ones. Molecular evaluation by 1D gel electrophoresis revealed that the separated protein patterns were highly expressed in the experiments than the controls. Using 2D gel electrophoresis, a total of seven and eight protein spots were revealed in experimental plants under 5% (w/v) and 10% (w/v) PEG treatment respectively while the control plants only expressed one protein. Increased drought stress resulted in a greater number of proteins with differential abundance.

Conclusion:

This study has successfully profiled the total osmotic stress responsive proteins and revealed the efficiency of proteomic tools in the qualitative detection of differential proteins from maize.

RESEARCH ARTICLE – The Presence of Microbial Air Contaminants in the Operating Theatre at a Teaching Hospital in East Coast Malaysia

Author: Ernest A. Adeghate

Journal: The Open Biology Journal

Abstract

Aim:

The aim of this study is to determine the presence of microbial air contaminants in the operating theatre at a teaching hospital.

Objective:

Airborne microbial level in operation theatre is one of the significant risks in hospital as it can increase the surgical site infection and nosocomial infections.

Background:

Duo SAS Super 360 Air Sampler was used to collect the airborne samples in triplicate each for nutrient and MacConkey agar at eight operation rooms and two corridors for morning and evening sessions. Sampling was conducted for three months and repeated every two months. Microbiological culture, gram staining and biochemical tests such as catalase test, oxidase test, coagulase test, Triple Sugar Iron Agar test, urease test, citrate test, Sulfide, Indole, Motility test, Methyl Red Voges-Proskauer test, disc diffusion test, and Albert’s stain were performed on the pure isolated culture.

Methods:

Sampling was conducted for three months and repeated every two months. Microbiological culture, gram staining and biochemical tests such as catalase test, oxidase test, coagulase test, Triple Sugar Iron Agar test, urease test, citrate test, Sulfide, Indole, Motility test, Methyl Red Voges- Proskauer test, disc diffusion test, and Albert’s stain were performed on the pure isolated culture. Bacteria that were present in the operation rooms were Bacillus spp., Micrococcus spp. and Staphylococcus spp. while Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii were absent. The bacteria identified in the operation theater may also cause surgical site infections and nosocomial infections to the patients, although the microbial contamination in the air of the operation theatre is low.

Results:

The bacteria identified in the operation theater may also cause surgical site infections and nosocomial infections to the patients, although the microbial contamination in the air of the operation theatre is low.

Conclusion:

Strengthening surveillance on the hygienic condition of the operation theatre and routine sampling is strongly recommended to control all possible sources and types of infection.

RESEARCH ARTICLE – Anti-diabetic Effect of Acridocarpus Orientalis

Author: Ernest A. Adeghate

Journal: The Open Medicinal Chemistry Journal

Abstract

Background:

Acridocarpus orientalis (AO) is a medicinal herb indigenous to tropical and subtropical Africa, Arabian Peninsula, and New Caledonia with reported anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties.

Objective:

To determine whether AO has any beneficial effects on diabetes-induced metabolic parameters in rats.

Materials and Methods:

Diabetes mellitus was induced in male Wistar rats by streptozotocin. Diabetic rats were treated with three doses of AO extract (50, 100, and 200 mg/kg BW) for 30 days. Kidney, liver, and pancreatic tissue samples were processed for histopathology to determine the effect of AO on the cells of these organs. The effect of AO on pancreatic islet cells and serum insulin levels was also examined using immunohistochemistry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay techniques, respectively.

Results:

AO (100 mg/kg BW) caused a marked reduction in blood glucose levels in diabetic rats compared to diabetic control on day 10 of the study. Moreover, AO (200 mg/kg BW) increased the number of insulin-positive cells with a concomitant reduction in the number of glucagon-immunoreactive cells in pancreatic islets. AO (100 mg/kg) also increased the serum level of superoxide dismutase significantly. Although the administration of AO was able to significantly decrease the diabetes-associated increases in serum creatinine and bilirubin levels, it had no effect on blood urea nitrogen, serum aspartate, or alanine aminotransferase levels. Histopathological examination showed that AO has no toxic effect on the structure of the pancreas, liver, and kidney.

Conclusion:

Our findings showed that AO could alleviate some complications of diabetes mellitus.

To access this article, please visit:

https://benthamopen.com/ABSTRACT/TOMCJ-14-132

The Open Orthopaedics Journal – Join the Editorial Board

Submit your CV at: madiha@benthamopen.com

The Open Orthopaedics Journal is an Open Access online journal, which publishes high quality research articles, reviews/mini-reviews, letters and guest edited single topic issues in all important areas of experimental and clinical research and surgery in orthopaedics. The journal encourages submissions related to the following fields:

  • Paediatric Orthopaedics, and Orthopaedic Rehabilitation
  • Arthroscopy
  • Spine and Spinal Deformities
  • Joint Replacement
  • Traumatologic Surgery
  • Sports Medicine
  • Hand Microsurgery
  • Foot and Ankle Surgery
  • Musculoskeletal Tumour Management

The Open Orthopaedics Journal – Become Executive Guest Editor

Bentham Open invites researchers to join as Executive Guest Editor for the journal, The Open Orthopaedics Journal.

The Open Orthopaedics Journal is an Open Access online journal, which publishes high quality research articles, reviews/mini-reviews, letters and guest edited single topic issues in all important areas of experimental and clinical research and surgery in orthopaedics. The journal encourages submissions related to the following fields:

  • Paediatric Orthopaedics, and Orthopaedic Rehabilitation
  • Arthroscopy
  • Spine and Spinal Deformities
  • Joint Replacement
  • Traumatologic Surgery
  • Sports Medicine
  • Hand Microsurgery
  • Foot and Ankle Surgery
  • Musculoskeletal Tumour Management

The Open Orthopaedics Journal, a peer-reviewed journal, is an important and reliable source of current information on important recent developments in the field. The emphasis will be on publishing quality papers rapidly and making them freely available to researchers worldwide.

The Open Orthopaedics Journal – Become an Ambassador

CALL FOR AMBASSADORS

Bentham Open invites researchers, scientists, faculty members, students and others relevant to join us as Bentham Open Ambassador. Following are the benefits and responsibilities of Bentham Ambassadors.

Submit your latest CV at madiha@benthamopen.net

Benefits Available to Bentham Open Ambassadors: 

  1. You will receive a Certificate of Acknowledgement for joining and rendering your services as a Bentham Open Ambassador
  2. As a Bentham Open Ambassador, you would have the possibility of having your first article published in any Bentham Open journal of your choice, at 50% discount on Open Access fee. For a listing of journals please refer to our website.   If you would refer more researchers to publish articles in our journals, we will be pleased to publish their articles at a 25% discount on our standard publishing rates.
  3. On earning 100 points you will be entitled to a 50% discount on the publication fee of your 2nd article and a full fee waiver for the 2nd article will be offered if you earn 200 points through your efforts to promote Bentham Open Publications.
  4. Your name and affiliation will be mentioned on a dedicated Bentham Open Ambassadors webpage, which will help you in your various promotional activities since your position will be visible for visitors on the website.
  5. As a Bentham Open Ambassador, you would have the possibility to get your institution listed as a Bentham Open Member Institute. An official request would be required from your institution for this. Being an author from the member institute(s), you and your colleagues (affiliated with the member institution) will receive a 50% special discount in the publication fee for your submission in Bentham Open journals and a centralized billing system for your institution can be developed. 
  6. We invite our Member Institutes to bear the Article Processing Charges (APCs) on behalf of their researchers. Each Member Institute is provided with a unique code for this provision. Affiliated researchers will need to mention this code while submitting an article.

 The responsibilities of Bentham Open Ambassadors would be to: 

  1. Introduce and promote Bentham Open journals among librarians, colleagues and researchers in your region.
  2. Encourage submission of articles to relevant Bentham Open journals, in your field, from eminent scientists.
  3. You may, if you wish, also appoint some young researchers as “Associate Bentham Open Ambassadors” to magnify this effort.