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How diet impacts Rheumatoid Arthritis

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Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) ranks amongst the top of the most prevalent autoimmune diseases. The cure to this disease hasn’t been found yet but various studies and experiments have shown that eating a certain kind of diet and avoiding some types of food can help reduce inflammation, which is at the core of arthritis.

A healthy diet for reducing inflammation related to RA begins with cutting back on inflammatory foods including sugar and processed food containing highly-saturated fats. Patients often report that their joints feel less sore after they have given up sugar.

The second part is to include foods that decrease inflammation, thus decreasing joint soreness, discomfort and morning aches. The best foods would be fish such as tuna, herring, trout, salmon, and mackerel because they contain Omega-3 fatty acids. Moreover, extra-virgin olive oil and foods containing high levels of fiber such as fruits, vegetables, beans, legumes and whole grains may also help reduce inflammation.

Vegetarian diets also soothe arthritis-related inflammation.  Conversely, meats – fried and grilled at high temperatures – have been found to aggravate arthritis inflammation.

So, making a few simple changes to your diet can alleviate the stiffness and inflammation related to arthritis. Dr. Humeira Badsha from Dr. Humeira Badsha Medical Center, Dubai, UAE, has published important research on this topic in the Bentham Open journal, The Open Rheumatology Journal.

 

To read the research, view: Role of Diet in Influencing Rheumatoid Arthritis Disease Activity

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Recently Published Article – ” Precision Medicine Approaches to Cancer Diagnosis and Treatment: Focus on Cancer Stem Cell Biomarkers”

Journal: The Open Biomarkers Journal

Author(s): Katarzyna Rygiel

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Abstract

Background:

Recent research evidence has revealed that cancer cells contain a subpopulation of cancer stem cells (CSCs) that can remain even after traditional oncology therapies (e.g.: surgical resection of a tumor, radiation therapy (RT), and chemotherapy (ChT)), and can subsequently regenerate the original tumor or metastases, which are resistant to standard anticancer treatments. Such a resistance can be activated in various CSC populations, via different signal transduction pathways.

Conclusion:

The signaling pathways (e.g.: NANOG, Wnt/β-catenin, Hedgehog, Notch, signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT 3), and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)) play a crucial role in the CSCs, leading to tumorigenesis and metastatic spread. Therefore, their detailed analysis, including innovative biomarkers, is necessary to develop the effective, novel therapies that will specifically target CSCs, in patients with aggressive cancers. This review briefly outlines the concept of CSCs, and key components of CSC dysregulation in the signaling pathways. Furthermore, it describes some innovative strategies, such as: Single-Cell Sequencing (SCS), Circulating Tumor Cells (CTCs), Disseminated Tumor Cells (DTCs), cell-free DNA (cfDNA), and circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) that may have critical importance in the detection, early diagnosis, prognosis and monitoring of patients with various, difficult to treat malignancies (e.g.: breast or gastrointestinal cancers). It also focuses on some barriers to achieving the clinical management goals (for both patients with cancers and the interdisciplinary treatment teams), as well as suggests some solutions, how to overcome them, in personalized oncology approaches.

To access this article, please visit: https://benthamopen.com/ABSTRACT/TOBIOMJ-8-9

 

 

Dr. Xiao Dong Zhou

Recently Published Article – “Exploring Receipt of HIV PEP Counseling Among Women Sexually Assaulted by an Intimate Partner”

Journal: The Open AIDS Journal

Author(s): Janice Du MontLily VanDaisy KosaSheila Macdonald

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Abstract

Among 136 women sexually assaulted by a current or former male intimate partner presenting to hospital-based violence treatment centers, 58 (42.6%) received HIV post-exposure prophylaxis (HIV PEP) counseling by a specially trained sexual assault nurse. We identified factors that were associated with receipt of HIV PEP counseling. Those who received counseling were more likely to have been younger than 25 years of age, single, a student, vaginally penetrated, and have received various other services (e.g., STI prophylaxis). They were less likely to have been unemployed. Hospital-based violence treatment centers need to be aware that not all women sexually assaulted by an intimate partner will have the same risk of acquisition of HIV and care needs.

To access this article, please visit: https://benthamopen.com/ABSTRACT/TOAIDJ-12-1

 

Recently Published Article – “Role of Diet in Influencing Rheumatoid Arthritis Disease Activity”

Journal: The Open Rheumatology Journal 

Author(s): Humeira Badsha

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Abstract

Background:

Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) frequently ask their doctors about which diets to follow, and even in the absence of advice from their physicians, many patients are undertaking various dietary interventions.

Discussion:

However, the role of dietary modifications in RA is not well understood. Several studies have tried to address these gaps in our understanding. Intestinal microbial modifications are being studied for the prevention and management of RA. Some benefits of vegan diet may be explained by antioxidant constituents, lactobacilli and fibre, and by potential changes in intestinal flora. Similarly, Mediterranean diet shows anti-inflammatory effects due to protective properties of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and vitamins, but also by influencing the gut microbiome. Gluten-free and elemental diets have been associated with some benefits in RA though the existing evidence is limited. Long-term intake of fish and other sources of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids are protective for development of RA. The benefits of fasting, anti-oxidant supplementation, flavanoids, and probiotics in RA are not clear. Vitamin D has been shown to influence autoimmunity and specifically decrease RA disease activity. The role of supplements such as fish oils and vitamin D should be explored in future trials to gain new insights in disease pathogenesis and develop RA-specific dietary recommendations.

Conclusion:

Specifically more research is needed to explore the association of diet and the gut microbiome and how this can influence RA disease activity.

To access this article, please visit: https://benthamopen.com/ABSTRACT/TORJ-12-19

Recently Published Article – “Histomorphometric Analysis of Bone Density in Relation to Tactile Sense of the Surgeon During Dental Implant Placement”

Journal: The Open Dentistry Journal

Author(s): Amir Reza RoknAkram LabibzadehAmir Alireza Rasouli GhohroudiAhmad Reza ShamshiriSomaye Solhjoo 

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Abstract

Introduction:

A correct diagnosis and optimal treatment planning is essential for success in implant dentistry. Proper diagnosis of bone quality is an important part of the diagnostic procedure.

Objective:

The purpose of this study was to correlate the tactile sense of the surgeon in the assessment of bone density to the histomorphometric analysis of bone quality.

Methods:

In this study, 56 bone samples from 33 patients were harvested from implant sites with trephine drills. The samples were analyzed with Image J software. In the samples following parameters were measured: BV/TV, superficial cortical plate thickness, the number and thickness of haversian canals in cortical bone and the number, thickness and distance of trabecules in cancellous bone. The clinical hardness of bone during drilling was evaluated by surgeon according to Misch. GEE analysis with exchangeable correlation structure and linear model was used to evaluate the relationship between the tactile sense of the surgeon and histomorphometric parameters and all analysis was adjusted for two confounding variables: gender and location.

Results:

There were 51.79% implants in D2 samples and 48.21% in D3. Bone classification according to Misch was significantly correlated to distance of trabecules in cancellous bone (P-value=0.05), and shown marginally significant correlation with mean superficial cortical bone thickness (P-value =0.07) and number of haversian canals (P-value =0.005) in cortical bone.

Discussion:

There were differences between our results and others. The authors believed that these differences mainly are because of confounding factors, that in this study were eliminated. The clinical finding during surgery can approximately explain the histologic properties of bone.

Conclusion:

It is concluded that tactile sense of the surgeon can exhibit the histologic properties of the bone, and we are able to estimate the healing prognosis of the bone in implant placement.

To access this article, please visit: https://benthamopen.com/ABSTRACT/TODENTJ-12-46

Recently Published Article – “Molecular Characterization of Multidrug Resistant Uropathogenic E. Coli Isolates from Jordanian Patients”

Journal: The Open Microbiology Journal 

Author(s): Yacoub R. NairoukhAzmi M. MahafzahAmal IrshaidAsem A. Shehabi

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Abstract

Background:

Emergence of multi-drug resistant uropathogenic E. coli strains is an increasing problem to empirical treatment of urinary tract infections in many countries. This study investigated the magnitude of this problem in Jordan.

Methods:

A total of 262 E. coli isolates were recovered from urine samples of Jordanian patients which were suspected to have urinary tract infections (UTIs). All isolates were primarily identified by routine biochemical tests and tested for antimicrobial susceptibility by disc diffusion method. Fifty representative Multidrug Resistance (MDR) E. coli isolates to 3 or more antibiotic classes were tested for the presence of resistance genes of blaCTX-M- 1, 9 and 15, carbapenemase (blaIMP, blaVIM, blaNDM-1, blaOXA-48), fluoroquinolones mutated genes (parC and gyrA) and clone of ST131 type using PCR methods.

Results:

A total of 150/262 (57.3%) of E. coli isolates were MDR. Urine samples of hospitalized patients showed significantly more MDR isolates than outpatients. Fifty representative MDR E. coli isolates indicated the following molecular characteristics: All were positive for mutated parC gene and gyrA and for ST131 clone, and 78% were positive for genes of CTX-M-15, 76% for CTX-M-I and for 8% CTX-M-9, respectively. Additionally, all 50 MDR E. coli isolates were negative for carbapenemase genes (blaIMP, blaVIM, blaNDM-1, blaOXA-48), except of one isolate was positive for blaKPC-2 .

Conclusion:

This study indicates alarming high rates recovery of MDR uropathogenic E. coli from Jordanian patients associated with high rates of positive ST131 clone, fluoroquinolone resistant and important types of blaCTX-M.

To access this article, please visit: https://benthamopen.com/ABSTRACT/TOMICROJ-12-1

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Recently Published Article – “What Percentage of Patients is a Candidate for Unicompartmental Knee Replacement at a Chinese Arthroplasty Center?”

Journal: Yong HeLianbo XiaoWeitao ZhaiMaximilian F. KasparekGuilin OuyangFriedrich Boettner

Author(s): The Open Orthopaedics Journal

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Abstract

Background:

Data on indication of Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty (UKA) in the Asian population are currently not available. The current paper evaluates patients undergoing knee replacement at a Chinese Orthopaedic Specialty Hospital to report the percentage of patients who meet radiographic and clinical indication criteria for UKA.

Methods:

Over a one-year period 463 consecutive patients (515 knees) underwent primary knee replacement surgery. Clinical data were recorded and preoperative radiographs were assessed. Patients were classified as suitable candidates for UKA based on the degree of deformity, preoperative ROM and radiographic appearance of osteoarthritis. The different indication criteria for body weight and extend of patellofemoral osteoarthritis as reported by Kozinn and Scott as well as the Oxford Group were applied.

Results:

160 knees (31%) were excluded because of inflammatory and posttraumatic arthritis. 55 knees had to be excluded because of incomplete radiographs. Of the remaining 300 knees with osteoarthritis, 241 knees were excluded because of extend of deformity (n=156), decreased range of motion (n=119), advanced patellofemoral arthritis with bone loss (n=11) and AP instability (n=1). Of the remaining 63 knees, 54 knees (18%) met the modified Oxford criteria for mobile UKA and only 25 knees (8%) met the Scott and Kozinn criteria for fixed UKA.

Conclusion:

The current paper suggests that in comparison to Caucasian population, only a smaller percentage of patients at a Chinese Orthopaedic Specialty Hospital meet the indication criteria for UKA. Therefore, it might make sense to concentrate UKA surgeries in high volume centers.

To access this article, please visit: https://benthamopen.com/ABSTRACT/TOORTHJ-12-17

 

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