Research Article: Evaluation of the Antioxidant Interactions Between Green Tea Polyphenols and Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs

Author: Fawaz Kurdali

Journal: The Open Agriculture Journal

Abstract:

Background:

During the freezing or canning preparation process of green grain leguminous, large amounts of shell pods are considered as agricultural organic wastes, which may be used as Green Manure (GM) for plant growth enhancement.

Objective:

Evaluation of the effectiveness of soil amended with shell pod wastes of pea (PGM) or faba bean (FGM) as GM on growth, nitrogen and phosphorus uptake in sorghum plants.

Methods:

Determination of the impact of adding four rates of nitrogen (0, 50, 100, and 150 kg N ha-1) in the form of pea (PGM) or faba bean (FGM) shell pod wastes as GM on the performance of sorghum using the indirect 15N isotopic dilution technique.

Results:

Sorghum plants responded positively and differently to the soil amendments with either GMs used, particularly, the PGM. In comparison with the control (N0), soil amendment with an equivalent rate of 3.5 t ha-1 of PGM (PGM100) or with 6.5 t ha-1 of FGM (FGM150) almost doubled dry weight, N and P uptake in different plant parts of sorghum. Regardless of the GM used, estimated values of %Ndfgm in sorghum plants ranged from 35% to 55% indicating that the use of pod shells as GM provided substantial portions and amounts of N requirements for sorghum. Moreover, nitrogen recoveries of added GM (%NUEgm) ranged from 29 to 45% indicating that N in both of GM forms were used effectively. Accordingly, equivalent amounts to 17 – 48 kg N ha-1 of inorganic fertilizer may be saved. The beneficial effect of incorporating pod shells in soil on sorghum N was mainly attributed to their N availability, besides to their effects on the improvement of soil N uptake, particularly when using PGM.

Conclusion:

The agricultural by-products of faba bean and pea pod shells could be used as GM for sorghum growth improvement by enhancing N and P uptake from soil and from the organic source.

To access this article, please visit:

https://benthamopen.com/ABSTRACT/TOASJ-13-133

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Research Article: Typology of Social Network Structures and Late-Life Depression in Low- and Middle-Income Countries

Author: Akin Ojagbemi

Journal: Clinical Practice & Epidemiology in Mental Health

Abstract:

Background:

Rapid social changes and youth migration ensures a continuous drain on the social networks of the elderly in Low- and Middle-Income Countries (LMICs).

Objective:

We reviewed available literature on the relationship between social network structures and depression among community dwelling older persons in LMICs with a view to identifying patterns that might provide information for designing preventive psychosocial interventions.

Methods:

We searched the MEDLINE database through Pubmed, extracted information on the typologies of social network structures in LMICs and identified dimensions with the strongest systematic association with late-life depression, by weight, using the inverse of variance method. All analyses were conducted using the Cochrane review manager version 5.3.

Results:

Fourteen community-based surveys drawn from 16 LMIC contexts met criteria for syntheses. They included a total of 37,917 mostly female (58.8%) participants with an average age of 73.2 years. Social network size, contact with network, diversity of network, co-residency with own child, having more friends than family in the network, and prestigious standing of persons in the social network were protective structures against late-life depression. Conversely, low network diversity contributed 44.2% of the weight of all social network structures that are predictive of late-life depression.

Conclusion:

Recommendations are made for the design of new measures of social network structures in LMICs that captures the key dimensions identified. Epidemiological studies using such tools will provide more precise information for planning and prioritization of scarce resources for the prevention of late-life depression in LMICs.

To access this article, please visit:

https://benthamopen.com/ABSTRACT/CPEMH-15-134

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Research Article: Evaluation of the Antioxidant Interactions Between Green Tea Polyphenols and Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs

Author: Krystyna Pyrzynska

Journal: Open Chemistry Journal

Abstract:

Introduction:

The antioxidant interactions between the commonly used pharmaceuticals (diclofenac, ibuprofen and naproxen) and green tea polyphenols were evaluated.

Methods:

The antioxidant properties of the mixtures were evaluated by a scavenging effect on the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH) radical.

Results:

The mixtures contained green tea extract and each drug exhibited lower antioxidant activity than the mathematical sum of the results obtained for individual components showing antagonistic effect. The results were obtained using isobolographic analysis and interaction factors also suggested the antagonistic type of interaction. Only when the concentration of the green tea infusion was relatively high (in comparison to the drug), an additive effect could be concluded.

Conclusion:

The high concentration of green tea infusion in comparison to the drug should be used in developing the new formulations as it can help in the therapy due to their antioxidant properties.

To access this article, please visit:

https://benthamopen.com/ABSTRACT/CHEM-6-47

 

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Research Article: T1 and T2 Mappings in the Early Diagnosis of Achilles Tendinosis

Author: Zeineb Tbini

Journal: Open Medicine Journal

Abstract:

Objective:

The purpose of this study was to compare T1 and T2 relaxation times of normal and pathologic Achilles Tendon (AT) in order to evaluate the ability of these methods to detect early Achilles tendon tendinosis.

Materials and Methods:

Forty-eight subjects were included in this study. Twenty-two subjects were classified as normal group and twenty-six subjects as patient group with tendinosis. MR examination was performed by 3 Tesla scanner using a 12 channel head coil. For relaxation times quantification, we used a sagittal 3D FLASH variable flip angle gradient echo UTE sequence (3D VFA-GE UTE) for T1 mapping and a sagittal Multi Echo Spin Echo sequence (MESE) for T2 mapping. Relaxation times were quantified using two different algorithms written in MATLAB. P value < 0.05 was considered statistically significant.

Results:

Our results showed a statistically significant difference in T1 and T2 values for the normal group compared to the patient group (p<0.05). Mean values of T1 and T2 were 571.69 ms and 24.16 ms for the normal group and 818.10 ms and 32.43 ms for the patient group, respectively. Results reported no correlation (r=0.193) for T1 mapping and a positive significant moderate correlation (r=0.542, p=0.000) for T2 mapping between the normal and patient groups. T1 and T2 showed no correlation in the normal group (r= 0.091, p=0.489) and a positive significant weak correlation in the patient group (r=0.263, p=0.048).

Conclusion:

We concluded that T1 and T2 relaxation times are relatively sensitive to diagnosis degenerative changes in the AT and T1 is more sensitive to AT tendinosis compared to T2.

To access this article, please visit:

https://benthamopen.com/ABSTRACT/MEDJ-6-83

 

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Research Article: Effects of the Sea Breeze Circulation on Soil Temperature Over Kuwait Using in Situ Observations and the ECMWF Model

Author: Hussain Alsarraf

Journal: The Open Atmospheric Science Journal

Abstract:

Background:

The mesoscale circulation over Kuwait is an important influence on changes in surface temperatures and soil temperatures.

Introduction:

This paper presents two common summertime atmospheric features over Kuwait linking wind circulation to soil temperatures.

Methods:

In this study, we use the European Centre for Medium-range Weather Forecasts ECMWF reanalysis ERA-Interim dataset to investigate effects of the synoptic scale and mesoscale circulations.

Results:

The results show that a large-scale pressure gradient in summer typically leads to northerly winds over Kuwait, while a weak synoptic-scale pressure gradient leads to light easterly humid winds from the Persian Gulf, consistent with a mesoscale circulation.

Conclusions:

The results demonstrate the significance of wind circulations in driving the Soil Temperature (SOILT). Using the Era-Interim/Land reanalysis dataset for August 2015 over Kuwait, the average SOILT on days of sea breeze is higher than the average SOILT on days dominated by a synoptic-scale pressure gradient.

To access this article, please visit:

https://benthamopen.com/ABSTRACT/TOASCJ-13-29

 

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Call for Papers | The Open Biomaterials Journal

Bentham Open is pleased to announce the launch of new open access journal, The Open Biomaterials Science Journal. The first volume of the journal will be available online by the start of the year, 2020.

The Open Biomaterials Science Journal is an Open Access online journal, which publishes research articles, reviews/mini-review, letters, case reports and guest edited single topic issues in all areas of biomaterials, biomedical device application, bioengineering, tissue engineering and medical items.

  • Medical Materials
  • Management of Device
  • Structural Biomaterials applied to Medicine
  • Orthopedic or Dental Implants
  • Oral Surgery
  • Maxillofacial Surgery
  • Plastic Surgery device
  • Operative Medicine
  • Fixed and Removable Prosthodontics
  • Biomaterials Science
  • Clinical Trials
  • Translational Research

The Open Biomaterials Science Journal a peer-reviewed journal, is an important and reliable source of current information on important recent developments in the field. The emphasis will be on publishing quality papers rapidly and freely available to researchers worldwide.

Each peer-reviewed article that is published in a Bentham OPEN Journal is universally and freely accessible via the Internet in an easily readable and printable PDF format.

All articles would be published FREE and no open access fee will be charged if submitted by December 31st, 2020.

To submit your paper, email at: beena@benthamopen.net and CC: faizan@benthamopen.net

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Become an Editorial Board Member (EBM) | BENTHAM OPEN JOURNALS 2020

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BECOME AN EDITORIAL BOARD MEMBER FOR THE OPEN JOURNALS

Bentham Opem is interested in appointing active Editorial Board Members on the Board for New journals listed below. If you are working in the related field as of the journals and are interested in becoming an Editorial Board Member, please send us your CV and a list of publications. If, however, the scope of the journal is not directly related to your field, you can recommend suitable colleagues for the same, and, if possible, send their CV along with their list of publications. Mention in the subject line the field of interest and send your CV at: beena@benthamopen.net and CC: faizan@benthamsopen.net